Thursday, September 25, 2008

Art Quilts

I just read a post by Alison Schwabe that really hit home. I so agree with what she is saying. Take a look and let me know what you think. I try to encourage my students to take what I am teaching them and make it their own, and sometimes that happens. I am always amazed and taught by my students but so many people are fearful when they should be joyful at the opportunity to make art that is their own.

6 comments:

Exuberant Color said...

And this is one of the reasons I have gotten away from teaching. A lot of new quilters want formula and rule based projects that can be completed in a short time with out any decisions on their part. I want to see experimentation and excitement in my classes, but very few sign up for any class with the word ART or DESIGN in the title.

Julia Wood said...

Good for Alison for being brave enough to say what many are afraid to utter. True art is not following a published pattern or exactly parroting a given technique. There is nothing wrong with doing those things, but it isn't original art.

Linda said...

When I take a quilt class (which is rarely) I want to learn a technique - then apply it with my own ideas. I do not want to follow a pattern - even tho I bought your DVD with pattern! I will use your techniques and add them to those I have learned from other fusers - Melody and Laura, in particular. Then I will experiment and play and produce my own pieces of fabric art.

K said...

I couldn't agree more with Allison.
Hopefully as a quilt artist becomes more comfortable with what they are doing they will spread their wings and soar into original work - some good, some bad and occasionally something great.

Karen said...

Learning the basics is a must for any artist. Technique without focus is just experimentation.
Nothing wrong with that but it takes a whole lot more to turn it into Art.

Leslie said...

I enjoy technique classes to add to my mental library, but I've taken a few art/design courses to satisfy my need to develop some "artistic sense." That takes time to develop and I'm glad there are people like you who provide classes that offer some structure while encouraging the freedom and courage of self-directed play with fabric. At least, that's what I experienced when I took your "Leaves" class. So, thank you to Frieda!

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